Maura O’Connor is a partner in the Real Estate Practice Group in the Los Angeles office of Seyfarth Shaw LLP.  Her practice focuses on real estate financing, acquisitions, development and leasing.  

Maura has extensive experience in complex real estate financing transactions, workouts and foreclosures since the late 1980s.  She has also handled many purchases and sales of environmentally contaminated properties.   She has served as lead counsel for myriad senior and mezzanine loans, lease financings, securitized transactions, ground leases and equity investments for a wide variety of investors, banks, insurance companies and others.

Maura has particular expertise in designing and implementing large-scale systematized and scalable programs to deliver legal services in real estate matters, most recently creating and leading such a program for a company that resulted in the successful acquisition of more than 150 sites totaling in value over $1.2 Billion over an 18 month period. 

Maura has also successfully led the acquisition, entitlement, and development of major industrial, manufacturing, infrastructure, warehouse and distribution facilities. S he has significant experience in handling foreign direct investment transactions by new entrants into the US and California markets. Her clients have included retailers, manufacturers, pharmacies, grocery chains, lenders, borrowers, hotel chains, shopping center owners, pharmaceutical companies, medical office complexes and ports. 

Maura was recognized as one of the top 10 real estate lawyers in Southern California by Real Estate Southern California in 2005, and is a prominent and frequent speaker to industry groups and author on real estate topics. 

Maura is also Chairman of the Los Angeles Economic Development Corporation.   She has also been honored as one of the Distinguished Alumni of the University of Minnesota Law School.

10 Responses to “About Maura O’Connor”


  1. 1 Bud Brandt July 1, 2009 at 6:22 pm

    Hi Maura,

    I found your articles to most informative. I hope all is well with you, and prhaps we will see each other soon.

    Bud

  2. 2 scott s. September 1, 2009 at 5:46 pm

    Good afternoon Maura,

    Your series on workouts has been extremely informative but I’ve only been able to read Parts 5 & 6. Is there any way I can get 1 through 4?

    Thanks in advance.

    Scott

    • 3 mauraboconnor September 1, 2009 at 6:12 pm

      Dear Scott:

      If you get into the blog, then use the search function box, which is located on the right side of the page, and search the term “Workouts 101”, the entire series will pop up. You can access the comments that have come in for each blog entry by clicking on the comments icon above each entry. Please let me know if you have any problems with this.

      Best regards,

      Maura

  3. 4 Reggie Lal September 13, 2009 at 3:59 pm

    Good info., thanks for posting.

    Thanks,
    Reggie Lal
    ReggieLal.com

  4. 5 Wes September 25, 2009 at 5:13 pm

    Maura,

    My question is in regards to the bidding process in a trustee sale. If the lender puts their bid on the table, but it is below their loan balance, does that restrict the lender from increasing their bid if another group comes in higher?

    Basically, I’m just trying to figure out if a lender really just has one opportunity to bid at the auction.

    Thanks
    Wes

    • 6 mauraboconnor September 25, 2009 at 7:44 pm

      Wes:

      In California, the lender can bid repetitively at the sale, like any other bidder. So it can put in a lower bid to start, then continue to bid throughout the sale if the lender deems it advisable.

      If the amount the lender bids goes over the amount it’s owed (and can credit bid), then the lender would have to come up with cash for the difference, like any other bidder. (However, in 21 years of practice in CA, I’ve never seen that happen — most lenders are happy to have the property collateral sold at the trustee’s sale so long as the price is high enough to pay off most or all of their debt.)

      Best regards,

      Maura O’Connor

  5. 7 Reseller Hosting January 4, 2010 at 12:28 pm

    Your blog keeps getting better and better! Your older articles are not as good as newer ones you have a lot more creativity and originality now keep it up!

  6. 8 Aldis Barrett July 11, 2010 at 1:41 am

    If the amount the lender bids goes over the amount it’s owed (and can credit bid), then the lender would have to come up with cash for the difference, like any other bidder. (However, in 21 years of practice in CA, I’ve never seen that happen — most lenders are happy to have the property collateral sold at the trustee’s sale so long as the price is high enough to pay off most or all of their debt.)
    +1

    • 9 mauraboconnor August 16, 2010 at 8:12 pm

      Dear Aldis:

      You are correct on both counts — if the lender wanted to bid more than the amount it is owed, it must pay the amount in excess of the debt it is owed in cash; and I’ve never seen that happen in 22 years practicing commercial real estate law in Southern California.

      Thanks for your comment. My apologies for the delay in responding.

      Best regards,

      Maura


  1. 1 The Hidden Tax on Savers - Trackback on May 21, 2010 at 7:09 pm

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Attorney Advertising. This blog is a periodical publication of Maura O'Connor, a partner of Seyfarth Shaw LLP and should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances. You are urged to consult a lawyer concerning any specific legal questions you may have. The contents are intended for general information purposes only and represent the individual views of Maura O'Connor only. Any tax information or advice contained herein is not intended to be and cannot be used by any taxpayer to avoid tax penalties that may be imposed on the taxpayer.

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