Avoiding The Devil’s Triangle (of Bank Failure, part 3)

In the last post, I described the methods used by the FDIC to “resolve” banks.  This post talks about what steps you can take if you are entering into a contract with a bank, and want to minimize your risk of having your deal pulled apart due to the bank’s failure.

Practical Steps to Take if you are Making a Deal with a Bank that may be Failing

Some kinds of deals have a reasonable chance of riding through a bank resolution.  In packaging banks’ assets (including loans) for sale, regulators have discretion to favor and preserve assets they think are essential to the marketplace.  The type of financial institution with which a company deals may matter also, because regulators can, and do, “play favorites” to ensure that their resolutions and bank closings do not excessively disrupt either geographic markets or market segments. In choosing which troubled banks to take over, and how to handle their receiverships and the ongoing deals those banks were involved in, the FDIC tries to keep some credit available to all creditworthy marketplaces.

In documenting deals with a bank to minimize the risks of its failure, even the most careful attorney faces several handicaps.  As discussed in the prior posts in this series, a bank is not likely to be able to provide timely reliable notification of its adverse or declining financial condition.   So, many of the covenants, certificates or defaults typically used in deals by lawyers to create early warnings and remedies if one party is about to fail do not work well with regulated financial institutions.

For this reason, if you are doing business with a bank, you usually will be best protected against receivership risk by economic, rather than contractual,  deal structuring.

To avoid being sucked into the morass of a bank receivership, first try to carefully select which bank you want to do business with, based on the market data you can find about that bank’s financial health.  Large counterparties dealing with financial institutions frequently distribute their risk across banks, using such mundane approaches as syndicated loan commitments, letters of credit with “confirming banks” (additional banks with undertakings to pay), and other risk-diversifying options.

Deal design may also play a role. Once a bank is near or in receivership, it is more likely that your deal with the bank will survive if it is a mutually positive transaction.  A bank receiver who is rejecting “the bad parts” of deals is not as likely to repudiate or sever off a “good deal.”  Together with your lawyers, you should watch for, and consider fixing, deal structures which put all of the bank’s obligations, or those most expensive or risky to the bank, at the end of a long timeline, such as interest rate resets, automatic extensions and certain unsecured credit funding commitments.  If the bank’s obligations and your company’s obligations come due about the same time, or alternate, there’s much less risk to your company.

If your company is entering into a contract with a bank, you need to work with your lawyer to protect your company in light of bank regulators’ power to reform or reject contracts and deals.   If the bank fails, your company’s post-resolution fortunes may be influenced by variables, including:

  •  whether the bank’s failure presents systemic risk to the financial markets,
  • the quality of documentation, and
  • the applicability of some protected classes of transaction.

Proofs of Claim and Creditors’ Evidence Generally

Anyone with rights against a failed bank, such as a debt, an existing lawsuit, or anticipated damages from a contract repudiation by the receiver, must take timely steps to keep the bank’s regulators officially aware of his or her rights.  Bank receiverships include a bankruptcy-like “proof of claim” process.  Failure to comply can result in a claim being rejected no matter what its merits.  So, creditors must be vigilant concerning notices of deadlines for their claims, and should work with counsel familiar with troubled bank workouts.

Another risk arises in the event of incomplete documentation or approvals.   Current receivership law codifies the special authority requirements set by the courts in the case D’Oench, Duhme & Co. v. FDIC.  The D’Oench, Duhme case held that a contract with a bank would not be honored in its later receivership if it is not in writing, signed by the right parties, formally approved by the bank at an appropriate board level, and correctly and continuously reflected in the bank’s official financial records.   When documenting a transaction with a bank, a company and its lawyers should insist that all important aspects of the deal are fully documented and approved by the bank.   Side letters and similar informal devices risk being repudiated by the FDIC.

In addition, the appearance of a deal may matter.   Because the FDIC’s Purchase and Assumption transactions happen at lightning speed, the receiver’s assessment and resolution of the bank’s commitments, or at least its initial sorting of the obligations (into those worth selling to an acquirer and those slated for liquidation), may be done very quickly.   Transactions that on their face appear economically feasible and perhaps are secured by valuable collateral, but in any case are not extraordinarily burdensome, may fare relatively better.

Finally, what ultimately happens to a creditor’s specific claim against a financial institution often depends on the nature and priority of the class of claim:   whether the creditor is a depositor, borrower, trade creditor, landlord or letter of credit holder.   Some of these specifics will be discussed in the next post.

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1 Response to “Avoiding The Devil’s Triangle (of Bank Failure, part 3)”



  1. 1 Banking 11: A reserve bank | G2Roms.com Trackback on April 13, 2010 at 7:02 am

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Attorney Advertising. This blog is a periodical publication of Maura O'Connor, a partner of Seyfarth Shaw LLP and should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances. You are urged to consult a lawyer concerning any specific legal questions you may have. The contents are intended for general information purposes only and represent the individual views of Maura O'Connor only. Any tax information or advice contained herein is not intended to be and cannot be used by any taxpayer to avoid tax penalties that may be imposed on the taxpayer.

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